The ageless joy of the bug hunt

Pterostichus

Black clock beetle, Pterostichus madidus

There are, sadly, probably more misguided perceptions about insects than there are accurate ‘takes’. But there are plenty of preconceived ideas about those who take an interest in them, too.

High among them is the sense that insect interest is just for kids; something that should be ‘grown out of’. Such views are supported by the high availability of products bearing insect iconography among children’s’ toys and clothing, with such imagery generally tapering off (but not entirely) with age.

Personally, I have recently come to a realisation that it’s not just my decidedly mediocre mathematics that put me off the idea of pursuing zoological interests in favour of journalistic ones, before returning now, in my thirties, to a world of pitfall traps and invertebrate amazement once again. I have been labouring for way too long under feelings that a keen intense interest in insects, and indeed nature more broadly, for its own sake is somehow juvenile – something to cringe about rather than indulge or even celebrate.

I still sometimes feel pangs of embarrassment when spotted out collecting ladybirds for my Master’s Research Project – but certainly feel more shame about the embarrassment than the insect love itself now, which is at least progress of sorts. It may never truly go away, but the act of marvelling at the bustle in the undergrowth is now, thankfully, winning.

This tussle with perceptions both real and imagined leads me to suspect that there are thousands of adults out there suppressing a love of everything insect in the name of misguided concepts of maturity. Indeed, it’s been notable, since starting this course, how many of my friends with kids have remarked to me how their child is really into one insect or another. Yeah, but which do YOU love?

Peacock_butterfly_(Aglais_io)_2

Peacock butterfly, Aglais io

I’m currently trying to indoctrinate my nieces in the ways of the insect world, in a not entirely dissimilar but somewhat gentler manner to that with which Harper Adams’ entomology course leader Simon Leather attempts to indoctrinate all students with a solid appreciation of the aphid. It’s going pretty well, but the bigger challenge might well be to ensure they don’t shun interest upon reaching a certain age.

Not everyone’s going to be so interested they pursue insects to an academic level of course, but it’s hard not to imagine that ecological prospects might be a fair bit more solid if every child bug enthusiast let themselves be an adult bug enthusiast without casting shade on themselves.

It’s not just suppression of interest for erroneous ideas about growing up that can make one lose sight of the simple pleasure of observing the fascinating and often downright bizarre machinations of the insect realm, though. On embarking upon entomological study, there’s a secondary risk of getting so heavily into the mighty detail of it all, whether that’s at a molecular or genetic level or simply studying the minutiae of an insect behavioural trait, that the simple pleasure of exploring what’s out there, or even marvelling at insects per se is lost. Every entomologist should aim to remind themselves every day what a joy getting the chance to work with such remarkable creatures is.

Whatever happens from here, I’ve got my bug love back – and this time I’m not going to let it lapse. Anyway, I need to wrap this up as I’ve got pitfall traps to set.