MRP: Optimising rearing conditions for black solider flies – Julian Beniers

Julian Beniers is a man with a mission. Before he even applied for the MSc course, he had formulated his Master’s Research Project (MRP), methods and all. During his BSc at HAS University of Applied Sciences, he started a project on black solider flies (Hermetia illucens) and became interested in their biology and behaviour. He then furthered this interest when doing an internship with the same species before coming to Harper Adams University (twitter: @HarperAdamsUni). By the time he arrived in Shropshire, his MRP was complete in all but execution.

Julian will be investigating the effect of protein and carbohydrate levels in black solider fly larvae foods and its relation to larval mass over the course of larval development, and potentially macronutrient levels within the larvae too (time permitting). He wants to answer the question “When do black soldier fly larvae begin producing large fat reserves, and specifically, at what weight does this normally occur?”. Black solider fly larvae rapidly become larger during their first instars and protein is likely to the most important macronutrient of their diet, whereas later in larval development, carbohydrates and fats may become more important. To answer his research question, Julian will attempt to map protein and fat content of larvae at precise intervals throughout their development by killing, drying and subjecting the dried tissue to Soxhlet and leco fat and protein analysis, respectively. He’ll also be using a variety of different foods with varying levels of protein and carbohydrate to see if these can be used to determine an optimal diet and growth rate. He suspects the larval mass at which a change in macronutrient storage occurs in between 140-160 mg.

This research is potentially quite commercially important because of the widespread use of black soldier fly larvae in the pet trade (food for exotic pets) and in human entomophagy (food for us). Interestingly, Julian gently suggests that this research may actually have been done before internally within pet food companies, however, as the Robin Hood of trade secrets, Julian attempts to get this research published, which could make things easier for other companies and independent rearers.

More generally, Julian is an avid keeper of entomofauna and is curious about the upcoming entomophagy industry in the West (an age-old industry in other parts of the world); he is planning to attend the Royal Entomological Society’s entomophagy day on April 4th.

Please don’t hesitate to contact me (details below) or Julian with advice or questions (twitter: @Julianosaurus; email: julianbeniers@hotmail.com; LinkedIn).

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Featured photo: Black solider fly larvae – photographed by Julian Beniers, of course!

Blog written by Max Tercel (email: max.tercel@hotmail.com; twitter: @MaximumInsect).

 

 

 

 

 

Parenting for Dummies (feat. burying beetles)

Festive greetings readership,

On a gloomy, mist-filled night, the life of a mouse is gently extinguished by disease. Its blood stills, its body cools, and a slight wind carries its almost imperceptible scent through the air. A faint buzzing approaches from the darkness, growing louder and louder; a flash of jet-black and red in the moonlight. Another. Then… silence. Two beetles scamper onto the carcass after their nightly flights. They are burying beetles, a male and a female, and have much to do over the next 2-3 weeks. Continue reading

Friday brings many good things. Nevermind the weekend, we love hymenopterans.

Greetings readership.

Friday brings us many things. Many good things (besides the end of the week).

Today, the students taking the Biology and Taxonomy of Insects module on the Applied Ecology suite of MSc courses here at Harper Adams University were treated to a day consisting entirely of Hymenoptera-related (wasps, bees and ants) lessons, from Dr Andrew Polaszek, of the Natural History Museum (NHM) in London. Starting the day off with an overview of the Order, Dr. Polaszek went on to characterise the super-families using morphological and ecological definitions. The class later went on to try our hand at the initially daunting task of  identifying specimens to super-family, family or genus level based on various keys. The fact that the majority of students were able to identify the specimens shows the quality of the keys and the direction Dr. Polaszek gave to us. By the end of the afternoon, most students had been identifying specimens for 2h30m, with the majority actively enjoying the process, and improving over the course of the day. Continue reading

Another day, another essay.

Greetings readership.

With another day, comes another Antenna scholarship essay for you to read. This one is from a highly knowledgeable colleague, Jack Cox, who completed his BSc in Zoology at the University of Derby. Specialising in orthopterans,  Jack has a particular interest in their taxonomy and behavioural ecology, aspiring to eventually conduct scientific research and have his work published. Keen on the idea of a PhD, he’d also be happy to work in industry or to eventually become a lecturer (if any readers would like to offer an opportunity to Jack *hint hint* you can contact him on jackryancox@msn.com).

Continue reading