The larvae emerge…

It’s that time of year again when a new cohort of enthusiastic entomologists begin their journeys at Harper Adams, which of course means new authorship of Mastering Entomology. So, this short post is going to introduce us as the new authors and let you know what you can expect from us across the next year.

We’ve written short pieces introducing ourselves:

Hi guys! My name is Aqib Ali and I am one of two curators of this blog, for this academic year. I’ve had an interest in “creepy crawlies” from a very young age. It began with a childish, albeit slightly morbid, curiosity (yes, I was one of those pulling-off-legs and offering-sacrificial-larvae-to-spider-overlords kind of kids). Although, this interest faded slightly as I moved through the mundane secondary school system, my love for life sciences remained constant and it led to me doing a BSc (Hons) Zoology degree at the University of Derby. As I passed through my undergraduate course, my passion for all things insect was slowly reignited. I did several modules with entomological content, one of which was “Applied Entomology”, taught by the likes of Professor Karim Vahed- a leading expert in the field of sexual selection and insects. With my interests piqued, I decided to do a dissertation on an aspect of sexual selection, namely intrasexual selection (male competition). I looked at whether weapon size affects the outcome of aggressive encounters in a cricket species (Platygryllus primiformis). I also sought out volunteering, such as a research assistant for forensic entomologist Dr. Kate Barnes, to broaden my entomological interests. By the end of my undergraduate degree my heart and head were both set on carrying on down the entomological path. Deciding what my next step would be was a no brainer: the MSc Entomology course at Harper Adams University. What attracted me to this course was its range of modules which cover a variety of topics, the excellent teaching quality and facilities, and that it’s quite literally one of a kind.

My entomological interests at this stage are broad and I am open to the many aspects of this diverse subject. Entering this course open-minded will allow me to fully experience and consider my options before I find my specialism. This journey has started with a bang with the Biology and Taxonomy module! In the short time, I’ve been here I’ve learnt so much! I hope to carry on learning new things, acquiring invaluable skills, amassing great experiences and most importantly, loving what I do.”- Aqib Ali

 

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The new cohort, learning some practical skills in Biology and Taxonomy of Insects (Photo by Aqib)

 

Hi I’m Linzi and I’m a graduate from Keele University studying Applied Environmental Science with Physical Geography. My interest in entomology began when we used aquatic insects as indicator species during a field trip to Cwm Idwal. This developed further throughout more field trips around Staffordshire and into France. When it came to my final year I selected modules that would allow me to focus my interests more and decided to base my dissertation on insects.

After hours of scouring news articles and journal articles I decided to investigate pesticide contamination in honey, particularly neonicotinoids. Although by the end of my experimental work I ended up looking for 91 different pesticides across five honey samples. I loved my dissertation and really wanted to take it further, this is what really set my mind on entomology. Hours and hours of reading articles about honey bees, and other beneficial pollinators had me captivated and after a short google search, my heart was set on Harper.

I have been lucky to be given the opportunity to study at Harper, and since arriving only three weeks ago I’ve already learnt so much and my interests have greatly broadened! I’m excited to keep broadening my interests and eventually find the area that I will  have a career in.Linzi Jay Thompson

So…that’s us! We will be publishing a variety of articles covering; our course, our interests and more. We aim to publish as regularly as possible (schedule permitting) so check back to see which exciting article we have posted. You can expect up to three articles per month covering a variety of topics, meanwhile, please follow us on twitter @EntoMasters for the latest updates, and follow our personal twitter accounts too @EntoAqib and @Apis_Linzi.

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Insect flight – an evolutionary development that shaped the world

Flying animals have had a major impact on nonflying organisms. Briefly consider the ecological and evolutionary interrelationships between pollinators and flowers, or between mosquitoes, the parasites they transmit and humans. Even a cursory glance at the manifold relationships flying insects have with all other forms of terrestrial life evaporates any doubt whether the world would be a very different place if they had never evolved.

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Parenting for Dummies (feat. burying beetles)

Festive greetings readership,

On a gloomy, mist-filled night, the life of a mouse is gently extinguished by disease. Its blood stills, its body cools, and a slight wind carries its almost imperceptible scent through the air. A faint buzzing approaches from the darkness, growing louder and louder; a flash of jet-black and red in the moonlight. Another. Then… silence. Two beetles scamper onto the carcass after their nightly flights. They are burying beetles, a male and a female, and have much to do over the next 2-3 weeks. Continue reading

Night takes Queen: where do all the wasps go in winter?

Season’s greetings readership,

As I type, millions of Vespula vulgaris (‘common wasp’) queens are in a deep slumber within dead logs, sheds, attic spaces, burrows, and innumerable other areas out of the British elements. Because all other members of a wasp colony die over winter, the survival of the queen is vital to regenerate populations in the spring and summer. But this process is far from simple, incorporating physiological and behavioural adaptations that must be timed accurately to prevent freezing, parasitism, predation,and starvation. The journey of a queen wasp is quite an incredible one involving death, opposition, sex, family, altruism, resurrection, and prejudice, and I would like to personally recommend it as a superior alternative to the biblical prose to which we are flooded at this time of year. Continue reading

How do bumblebees fly?

Greetings readership,

The flight of the bumblebee is not only an excellent classical piece composed by Rimsky-Korsakov, but also the subject of another ‘fact’ about insects, which usually goes something like: “According to the laws of physics, bumblebees shouldn’t be able to fly.” or a phrase of similar meaning. Indeed, the violation of the observably consistent Newtonian Laws of Motion by bumblebees and only bumblebees is not a very strong position to hold and might suggest the advocate of this belief should more fully examine how bumblebees generate lift. I shall try to provide such an examination. But first, let us delve into insect flight more generally!

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A bumblebee ‘defying the laws of physics’

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It’s the final essay! Also: What can you expect to see from us in the future?

Greetings readership.

Here we have the final scholarship essay, soon be published in the Royal Entomological Society’s members’ magazine, Antenna. Its author is Siobhan Anne-Marie Hillman. She developed her love of entomology whilst studying at the University of Derby, graduating with a BSc in Zoology. Siobhan’s main interests are in Continue reading

A new week, a new essay! (Plus, ‘Bugs’)

Greetings readership.

Below awaits another scholarship essay from a student studying the Entomology MSc here at Harper Adams Univsersity, soon to be published in The Royal Entomology Society’s members’ magazine, Antenna. But before that, a little detail on our ongoing module Biology and Taxonomy of Insects. Continue reading